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Chairs & Panels

 

Please find below a list of our Panels with Chairs, Speakers and hyperlinks to the panel's bios:

  

Keynote Panel (left to right) Anton Reijnders, Panny Byrne, Janet Mansfield, Akio Takamori, Clare Twomey

 

 

Looking Outside the Box  Chair:  Greg Daly. Speakers:  Clarissa Reegan, Tania Rollond, Graham Hay, Amy Kennedy.

 

Philosophical and Ethical Direction  Chair:  Dr Robert Bell.  Speakers:  Dr Julie Bartholomew, Gerry Wedd, Jacqueline Spedding, Clare Twomey.

 

Cultural and Identity  Chair:  Jeff Mincham.  Speaker:  Yi-Hui Wang (Taiwan), Vipoo Srivilasa, Avital Sheffer, Akio Takamori (USA).

 

Fragmented Grounds, Divergent Practice  Chair:  Paul Scott (UK).  Speakers:  Arun Sharma, Stephen Benwell, Steve Davies, Penny Byrne.

 

Notes from the Departure Lounge  Chair:  Owen Rye.  Speakers:  Yuri Wiedenhofer, Neil Hoffmann, Steve Williams, Rowley Drysdale.

 

Team Effort - Installation and Collaboration Experiences  Chair:  Stephanie Outridge Field.  Speakers:  Fiona Fell, Kris Coad, Stephanie Outridge Field presenting for Gwyn Hanson Piggott, Anton Reijnders.

 

Critwriticaling: a discussion about wat's write and rong about critical writing in contemporary ceramics  Chair:  Vicki Grima.  Speakers:  Dr Peter Wilson, Dr Damon Moon, Altair Roelants, Moya Elliott (NZ).

 

Hyperclay: Contemporary Ceramics  Chair:  Danielle Robson.  Speakers:  Stephen Bird, Jacqueline Clayton, Rod Bamford.

 

Sustainable Practice - Oxymoronic or Axomatic Chair:  Janet DeBoos.  Speakers:  Cathy Keys, Ben Richardson, Liz Stops, Rod Bamford.

 

Lighting Fires and Building Futures  Chair:  Bruce Nuske.  Speakers:  Liz Williams, Jan Guy, Prue Venables, Jane Sawyer, Gus Clutterbuck.

 

Shamless Self Promotion  Chair:  Brian Parkes.  Speakers: Robyn Phelan, Anna Maas, Fleur Schell, Leslie Ferrin (USA).

 

Working Together: Indigenous Australian Ceramics as Collaborative Partners  Chair:  Dr Christine Nicholls.  Speakers:  Milyika Carroll, Tom Miller, Darryl Pfitzner, Janet Fieldhouse.

 

Interrogating Ceramic Histories: Graduate Student Research Panel  Chair:  Dr Patsy Hely.  Speakers:  Sally Cleary (RMIT), Cathy Franzi (ANU), Trevor Fry (COFA), Clarissa Regan (SCA).

 

Learning Against the Tide – Student Panel  Chair:  Alison Smiles

 

 

 

Looking Outside the Box

Chair:  Greg Daly (Aus)

Greg Daly, Dappled

Greg Daly is a ceramic artist resident of the Cowra district. A member of the International Academy of Ceramics - Geneva, he is a ceramicist of national and international standing with works in over 75 national and international galleries / museums. Daly has participated in more than 150 group exhibitions, and has shown in over 76 Solo Exhibitions throughout Australia.

Across his proliffic career to date, Daly has been awarded 37 National and International Awards, published Glazes and Glazing Techniques and Lustres, and had work appear in excess of 20 published books on Ceramics.

Featured Artwork: Dappled

 

Speakers:

 

Clarissa Regan

Clarissa Regan is an artist/writer from Sydney. She is currently a PhD candidate at the Sydney College of the Arts, Sydney University. She has been awarded a post-graduate scholarship to undertake research into her project examining the effects of digital screen culture upon contemporary society. Clarissa is a practicing artist who works incorporates print transfer techniques in her ceramics, as well as figurative forms. She both writes and works in the ceramic art field, and was invited to deliver a conference paper at the NZ Society of Potters Annual Conference in Auckland, April 2011. She teaches ceramic workshops and in the TAFE sector. She has exhibited widely in NSW, in both regional galleries such as Hazelhurst, Casula Powerhouse and the Shoalhaven Gallery, as well as in artist-run co-operatives such as the Inner City Clayworkers Gallery. Her work was recently featured in 500 Vases (Lark Books, 2010). She holds a Master of Visual Arts from SCA (2009) and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) from the National Art School (2006).

Featured Artwork: Regan Hansel in Cage

 

Tania Rollond

Tania Rollond

Tania Rollond is a Sydney based artist who makes ceramics and drawings, and often combines the two. She studied design at Curtin University, ceramics at the National Art School, and most recently completed her Master of Fine Arts (by Research) in drawing at College of Fine Arts (UNSW).Currently a Lecturer in Ceramics at NAS, she has been teaching and exhibiting ceramics regularly since 2001.

Working between representation and abstraction, she makes drawings on (and about) objects to explore questions of recognition and meaning.

Featured Artwork:  Untitled (from the objects and images series)

Transcript: Tania Rollond

 

Graham Hay

Graham Hay

Despite specialising in ceramics at high school, college, and in degrees at Edith Cowan and Curtin Universities,

“It is hard to describe the work that he makes. It is totally original, fitting into no known category and not seeming to come from any recognizable ceramic tradition, but rather to derive from the way in which animal structures are built.”  (Anne Lightwood, author: Paperclay and other clay additives, Crowood Press, UK (2008).)

Graham's work has appeared in 150 exhibitions in ten countries, is in public collections in six countries, and features in a dozen books.

Often interpreted as being marine inspired, he describes his work as “a futile attempt to illustrate a dynamic sociological perspective of the Arts and Crafts”  Inspiration comes from a childhood spent herding animals, work as a professional political lobbyist, observing closely unique Western Australian native plants, and maintaing a 10,000 artist and craftspeople database for two decades.

Also over this period, Graham has been invited to give 250 demonstrations or workshops in a dozen countries.  This includes national conferences in eight countries, and co-leading the Hungarian, US and Norwegian international paper clay symposiums.  Over 25 articles by him have been published in Australian, UK and US ceramic and art journals.

Recently he has been commissioned to and successfully created large, permanent living sculptures.

Despite his above mentioned travels and activities generating ten tonne of carbon pollution per annum, and attracting 1.2 m annual visitors to his informative website, Graham still resides in remote Perth, Western Australia.

Featured Artwork: Loose circle (Cagdas Sanatlar Muzesi, Anadolu Universitesi, Turkey)

Transcript: Graham Hay

 

Amy Kennedy

Amy Kennedy

Amy Kennedy graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (Fine Art) Honours from RMIT, Melbourne, in 2006. In 2008 Amy undertook a three month residency at the European Ceramic Work Centre, The Netherlands and was awarded The Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship for Emerging Artists. She was a finalist in The Emerging Makers Award at the 2011 International Ceramics Festival, Aberystwyth, Wales. Most recently Amy was awarded a 2012 residency at the Anderson Ranch Arts Centre, Colorado. This project was assisted by the Ian Potter Cultural Trust. Her work is represented in the collections of The Bendigo Regional Art Gallery, The Warrnambool Art Gallery and The European Ceramic Work Centre.

Taking inspiration from forms and structures of the natural world, Kennedy creates sculptural works in which fine paper-thin leaves of glaze material are assembled to form layered objects. Working with delicacy and movement she aims to create works that are seemingly made and found simultaneously.

Featured Artwork: Vibration Series  Photograph by Jeremy Dillon

Transcript: Amy Kenedy

 

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Philosophical and Ethical Direction

Chair:  Dr Robert Bell (Australia)

Dr Robert Bell AM has been Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design at the National Gallery of Australia since 2000, responsible for contributing to its policy, collection development, exhibitions and research programs in Australian and international decorative arts, craft and design. Born in Perth, WA he holds a PhD from the Australian National University and writes and lectures regularly on crafts, design and the decorative arts. He was awarded the Centenary Medal for services to the decorative arts in Australia (2003); the Australia Council Visual Art Board Emeritus Medal for service to the crafts in Australia (2005); and made a member of the Order of Australia for services to craft, design and museums (2010). He is Patron of Craft ACT, Adjunct Professor of Design in the University of Canberra’s Faculty of Arts and Design and an elected member of the International Academy of Ceramics.

 

Speakers:

 

Gerry Wedd

Gerry Wedd

Gerry was born in 1957. He studied jewellery making, painting, drawing and ceramics in which he has a Masters degree. In 1991 he began designing for Mambo Graphics: beginning a relationship which continued until 2006.

He has worked in consultation with a number of community groups to produce graphics and public art works. Gerry exhibits nationally and internationally and has work in many public collections including the Australian National Gallery and the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney.

In 1998 he received the premier prize at the Sidney Myer Fund International Ceramics Award. In 2009 his work was exhibited as part of the Havana Bienal. In the same year he was the subject of the SALA monograph. He has been the recipient of a number of grants from ArtsSa and the Australia Council

 

Featured Artwork: In the Woods (roo)

 

Jacqueline Spedding

Jacqueline Spedding is an artist based in the Blue Mountains, a world heritage national park 100 kilometres west of Sydney, on the east coast of Australia.

 

She studied visual arts, majoring in ceramics, at Sydney College of the Arts where she completed her Bachelor of Visual Arts and Post-graduate Diploma in Visual Arts (1992-1996) before going on to complete a Masters of Fine Arts (2009-11).

 

In 2010 she was awarded the Zelda Stedman Student Travel Scholarship through the University of Sydney to travel to the United Kingdom on exchange where she completed a semester of her MFA at Cardiff School of Art and Design in the Masters of Ceramics program.

 

For me, the creative process is an exploration of concepts through materials: one informs the other. In my practice I have used clay, wood, metal, wax, resin, and paper – each material lending something different to the expression of my ideas. Ceramics is, though, ‘first principles’: my understanding of clay, of its material qualities and expressive possibilities, informs all my other material choices.”

Featured Artwork: Loess, 2011.  Photography:  Michael Myers

Transcript: Jacquieline Spedding

 

Dr Julie Bartholomew

Julie Bartholomew

Dr Julie Bartholomew is an artist and educator in ceramics. Her practice is based upon a long-term interest in contemporary issues including consumer culture, particularly the relationship between female identity and global branding within the context of western and eastern cultures. Recent work explores the precarious existence of threatened Australian birds and flowers.

The industrial technologies of mould making and casting are transformed within Julie’s practice to become tools for sculpture and installation. These technologies allow her to “sample” and manipulate bodies and objects from life in order to explore conceptual intent and generate associations that are integral to the processes and ceramic materials used.

Julie has participated extensively in exhibitions and residencies in Australia and abroad. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including two Australia Council for the Arts New Work Grants, the Tokyo Studio Residency, Australia-China Council Red Gate Residency in Beijing and the Asialink Taiwan Residency. After receiving an Australian Post-Graduate Award, Julie completed her Doctorate in Visual Arts at the COFA, UNSW

Featured Artwork: Paradise Lost (detail)

 

Clare Twomey (UK)

Twomey is a British ceramic artist who specialises in large-scale installations, sculpture and site-specific work. She has exhibited widely, including at the Tate, UK; Victoria and Albert Museum, UK; Crafts Council, UK; and  Museum of Modern Art Kyoto, Japan.

Clare's work is influenced by observations of human interaction and political behaviour and pursues her interest in space, architectural interventions and the gallery as destination. Her recent installation, 'Conscience / Conscience' at the Ceramic Biennale in Korea, consisted of 3000 hollow bone china tiles laid on the floor.  Guests were invited to walk into the gallery space, crushing the tiles underfoot as they moved about.

Twomey's installations reinvent and re-examine the way in which artists work in clay and, importantly, the way their work is presented in public environments. She subtly alters a gallery space, challenging our perceptions and the way we behave in those settings.

Featured Artwork: Trophy (installation at V&A Museum, London)

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Cultural and Identity

Chair:  Jeff Mincham (Aus)

jeff mincham 1

Inspired by his childhood home in the Coorong, as well as his current home in the Adelaide Hills, Jeffery Mincham's work has had a resounding impact on the contemporary studio ceramic movement in Australia.

Mincham undertook 5 years of formal training under such luminaries as Milton Moon and Les Blakebrough, and first exhibited in 1976. In 2009 he was instated with the title of 'Living Treasure' through Craft Australia, and in 2011 was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia (AM).

Mincham's work has a recognizable landscape quality which is inspired mainly from his view from his studio, the weather patturns, seasons and farming lands nearby. He is mostly known for his hand built clay bodies and multi-fired glazes that paint a literal or abstracted sense of landscape across or around the form. He sometimes employs deep textural marks that hint at the landscape they are inspired by, and his palette meanders from deep copper greens, rusty reds and soft creams, with contrasting pockets of black.

 

Speakers:

 

Yu-Hui Wang (Taiwan)

Yi-Hui Wang was born in Keelung, Taiwan. She was begun using clay as a medium to create her art when she firstly, did BFA at the National Taiwan University of Arts(NTUA), continued her MFA degree in Taipei National University of the Arts(TNUA)and finished her PhD at Sydney College of the Art in 2009, Australia. Wang is an artist and educator. She currently is Assistant Professor of Department of arts and Creative Industries at the National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan.

As part of her research she makes ceramics objects and installations investigating the relationship between the material and body in the comprehension of the historiography of ceramics and contemporary art. Her creations reflect crucial concepts of gender identity and a dialogue with a multicultural interaction which translates the meaning by itself into art form without human language.

Featured Artwork: Her Story

 

Avital Sheffer

Avital Sheffer grew up in Israel and arrived in Australia 1990. Her life long engagement with multi - faceted Middle–Eastern cultures, history and design leads her inquiry into fundamental human concerns of materiality and spirituality, origins and the contemporary, language and memory - complexities and dilemmas she explores in her work.

Since 2004 Sheffer had held eighteen solo exhibitions in Australia, USA and the UK, including a touring show to Regional Galleries. Her work was presented at Collect, Art London, Sofa NY & Chicago, she has participated in numerous invitational group exhibitions and competitions and won several awards. In 2006 and 2008 she received Australia Council grants for new work. Her work is held in public collections such as the NGA, Sydney Powerhouse, Atelier d'Art de France, Manly Art Gallery & Museum, Jewish Museum of Australia, Regional Galleries across Australia, as well as private, corporate and Foundations collections in Australia, US and UK.

Her work features in many art publications, the latest being The Pot Book by Edmund de Waal.

Featured Artwork: Seed II 2012

 

Vipoo Srivilasa

Vipoo Srivilasa

Thai born, Melbourne-based artist Vipoo Srivilasa works mostly in ceramics, exploring similarities between the cultures of his native home, Thailand and his adoptive home, Australia. His work is a playful blend of historical figurative and decorative art practices with a healthy dose of contemporary culture.

Using blue and white colour, he creates complex narratives through highly decorated images applied to the surfaces of ceramic forms. His work requires an intimacy in which the key elements of the drama are often found in unusual places within the forms themselves.

Vipoo’s work features in many public collections such as the Shepparton Art Gallery, Victoria; Art Bank Australia, Melbourne; Tasmania Museum and Art Gallery, Tasmania; Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery, Queensland and The Art Gallery of South Australia.

His works and profile appear in ABC Sunday Arts, SBS radio, Art and Australia magazine, Belle Magazine, Vogue Living Magazine, Inside Out magazine, Contemporary Ceramics by Emmanuel Cooper, Confrontational Ceramics by Judith S. Schwartz and Sex Pots by Paul Mathieu.

Featured Artwork: Mickeys Masquerade

 

Akio Takamori (USA)

Takamori was born in Japan but has lived in the US since 1974. His work is represented in many public collections, including the Carnegie Museum of Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; American Craft Museum; Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; George Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art, Canada; Shigaraki Ceramic Cultural Park, Japan; and Ariana Museum, Switzerland.

Takamori’s work has always been figurative, based on the human body and expressive of human relationships, emotion and sensuality. Initially making vessel forms adorned with painted figurative details, he later shifted to an interest in sculpture. Standing and sleeping figures portray historical characters, contemporary society and rural villagers, their day-to-day existence recalled from his childhood in Japan. He has recreated his hometown from memory using clay and translated traditional Japanese prints into three dimensional porcelain figures. Takamori's ceramic sculptures evoke an eerie sense of reality and presence. Since 1993 he has been a faculty member in the University of Washington School of Art.

Featured Artwork: boy in blue shoes (2010)

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Fragmented Grounds, Divergent Practice

Chair:  Paul Scott (UK)

Paul Scott

Paul Scott is an artist, author and educator known for pioneering research into the graphic development of vitreous surfaces. His characteristic artworks can be found in public spaces and collections around the globe. He is Professor of Ceramic Art at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO) Norway, and has recently been appointed Digital Research Fellow at Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design.

 

Speakers:

 

Arun Sharma

Arun Sharma

Arun Sharma was born and raised in New York State. He holds a MA Ceramics from University of Wales Institute (UK), a MFA from the University of Washington (USA), and a BFA from Alfred University (USA). He has lived and worked as an artist in Canada, Japan, Australia and most recently the UK where he was awarded a US-UK Fulbright grant to research the Fragmented Figure at the National Center for Ceramic Studies at the University of Wales Institute in Cardiff.  Sharma’s autobiographical artwork revolves mainly around the figure. He examines birth and death and their relationship in the overall schema of human life. He is also interested in the relationship clay has to the human body, both physically and metaphorically. Using emotively beautiful work he elevates the viewer’s senses by drawing them into a world beyond the familiar, all the while presenting identifiable themes. He now lives in Sydney and continues to exhibit his artwork nationally and internationally.

Featured Artwork: (de)composition: man

 

Steven Benwell

Stephen Benwell was born in Melbourne in 1953. After 30 years of professional practice as a ceramicist, Benwell returned to study in 2003 to complete a Masters of Fine Art at Monash University.

Benwell has exhibited regularly since 1975 in almost 30 solo exhibitions. He has also participated in many group exhibitions both in Australia and overseas. In recent years he was awarded the Inaugural Deakin University Contemporary Small Sculpture Award (2009) and the Sidney Myer Fund Australian Ceramic Award (2010). In 2010 he was also a finalist in the Hobart Art Prize and the Fletcher Jones Art Prize and included in Bravura: 21st Century Australian Craft, Art Gallery of South Australia. Heide MoMA will curate a survey of his ceramics scheduled for 2013.

His work is characterized by hand built vessels where painted, glazed surfaces display an individual iconography. Equally central to his current work are a series of statues based on Greco-Roman sculpture.

Featured Artwork: Statue (2011)

 

Steve Davies

Steve Daviesis a professional ceramic artist and has a Masters Degree in Visual Arts (Ceramics) from Southern Cross University, A Graduate Diploma in Visual Arts (Ceramics) from Monash University, a Diploma in Applied Arts from Charles Sturt University and a Bachelor of Education. His works are in public collections in Australia, Korea, Japan, China, Thailand, Taiwan ,Lithuania, Croatia, and Austria. Steve is represented byMossgreen Gallery, Melbourne andGallery One, Gold Coast.

 

Much of our life is built on the hope for tomorrow but hope brings us closer to death, once stripped of its romanticisms, the world is a foreign strange and inhuman place. Embracing the contradiction and absurdity of the clash between our futile search for meaning, unity and clarity in the face of an unintelligible world and our inability to contemplate our own unimportance, these objects represent a dance between reality, inner visions fand the outside world, exploring the increasing disconnection between nature culture and the modern day work life. They suggest a figurative power to embody thoughts and emotions that may have their origins in childhood, but are not childish. Recognizing parts of ourselves- our secret selves our unexpressed dreaming selves, they represent a journey from headspace to reality. Encoded with manifold layers of data-words, numbers,images, and equations these works present a visual metaphor for our desire to find meaning within the complex of contemporary culture.

Featured Artwork: Companion Planting in Flagrante (Caught in the Act)

 

Penny Byrne

Penny Byrne is a visual artist who meticulously reconstructs manipulated figurines from damaged and antiquated ceramic objects into artworks that wield a political message. The use of fragile ceramics contradicts the political messages evident in her work. Byrne’s satirical viewpoint confronts a number of contemporary political issues that presents an ongoing inquiry into popular culture and international politics. Her training as a ceramics conservator informs her practice. She has completed a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) at La Trobe University, Melbourne 1997, a Bachelor of Art (Fine Art Ceramics) at RMIT University in Melbourne, 1987 and a Graduate Diploma (Ceramics and Glass Conservation and Restoration) at West Dean College in the United Kingdom, 1990. Byrne is currently represented by Sullivan+Strumpf Gallery, Sydney NSW Australia.

Penny Byrne is a visual artist who meticulously reconstructs manipulated figurines from damaged and antiquated ceramic objects into artworks that wield a political message. The use of fragile ceramics contradicts the political messages evident in her work.

Byrne’s satirical viewpoint confronts a number of contemporary political issues that presents an ongoing inquiry into popular culture and international politics. Her training as a ceramics conservator informs her practice.

Byrne completed a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) at La Trobe University, Melbourne 1997, a Bachelor of Art (Fine Art Ceramics) at RMIT University in Melbourne, 1987 and a Graduate Diploma (Ceramics and Glass Conservation and Restoration) at West Dean College in the United Kingdom, 1990. Byrne is currently represented by Sullivan+Strumpf Gallery, Sydney NSW Australia.

Featured Artwork: Keep Young and Beautiful, if you want to be loved

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Notes from the Departure Lounge

Chair:  Owen Rye (Aus)

Owen Rye from Australia has worked in many aspects of ceramics including archaeology, teaching postgraduate students, making and exhibiting woodfired work in Australia and internationally, delivering workshops on woodfiring here and overseas, curating exhibitions, organising conferences, and writing books and articles for many ceramics magazines including his recent book The Art of Woodfire.  His work is represented in public collections in USA, China, Korea, Germany, France, and many Australian collections including the Australian National and state galleries. He is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics.

Owen Rye from Australia has worked in many aspects of ceramics including archaeology, teaching postgraduate students, making and exhibiting woodfired work in Australia and internationally, delivering workshops on woodfiring here and overseas, curating exhibitions, organising conferences, and writing books and articles for many ceramics magazines including his recent book The Art of Woodfire.

His work is represented in public collections in USA, China, Korea, Germany, France, and many Australian collections including the Australian National and state galleries.

He is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics.

 

Speakers:

 

Yuri Wiedenhofer

standing scat sculpture on the edge 2011 yuri wiedenhofer copy

Yuri Wiedenhofer is best known for his fire sculptures, structures that utilise fire to invoke suggestions of ceremony and ritual, to make people who think, think about fire and what it has meant to people in the past and what it now means to us. Apart from this thought provoking aspect, the structures are ingenious and inventive and the fire performance itself can have considerable beauty. Yuri's work has won Australian sculpture awards so it clearly crosses art traditional boundaries.

At its simplest, his philosophy insists on a thorough technical understanding of the ceramic process. A life-long general knowledge is gathered and allowed to form deep sediment embedded in the sub-conscious. His creative work draws on instinct to uncover a lead to solutions as other forces freely play with the vision.

Yuri has resisted and engaged the world at his feet for as long as he knows. He pulls at triggers to fire the neurons, dredging the memory of lived experience.

Featured Artwork: Standing Scat, Sculpture on the Edge 2011

Transcript: Yuri Wiedenhofer

 

Neil Hoffmann

Neil Hoffmann lives and works in Reedy Marsh northern Tasmania, having moved there from Victoria to establish his ceramics art practice in 1981. His distinctive work is mostly sculptural in emphasis, with wood firing currently his preferred method. Found dolerite rock from his immediate forested surrounds is frequently incorporated into fired works. Neil recently convened Woodfire Tasmania 2011in his home town Deloraine.

 

Featured Artwork:

 

Steve Williams

Steve Williams

Born 1960 in Wagga Wagga NSW and originally trained as a secondary art teacher, Steve has blended his enthusiasm for education with his woodfired ceramics passion for over 30 years.

Steve moves freely between making sculpture and functional vessels and often incorporates non clay materials into his work. Steve has demonstrated his non-conventional approaches to making at conferences and festivals in Japan, China and Australia.

Steve built two anagama kilns at his Wagga studio and fired 3-4 times a year between 1987 and 2007. It was during this period that he first used found objects as forming tools and as part of the finished works. Steve enjoys the challenge of making work in unfamiliar environments ... new places, new objects and stories to tell.

Steve transferred as Head Teacher from Wagga Wagga to Great Lakes TAFE, North Coast Institute in 2007. With a particular interest in design Steve introduced ceramics into the Aboriginal Design Program which he established in 2010.  As an educator and artist Steve thrives on establishing learning environments that challenge individuals and establishes personal direction and invention.

Steve has work held in a number of collections, here and abroad.

 

Rowley Drysdale

ethyr surfers alt. view

Awarded the Peter Voulkos Medal for things he'd forgotten he'd done, and not particularly well, Rowley Drysdale is a mediocre man always at his best.

He has been making clay objects for at least 30 years which he fires, thereby ensuring any embedded miscalculation, misappropriation, misery, hangs around.

He is a regular visitor to China, Japan and Korea. In 2011 he was invited to the World Ceramic Biennale to participate in the international workshop program at Yeoju, Korea. He is returning later this year as part of another ceramic exchange.

Renowned for never having spoken at a ceramic conference about his own work, Drysdale may well get off the mark (with a snick through slips) in 2012.

Featured Artwork: Ethyr Surfers

Transcript: Rowley Drysdale  

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Team Effort - Installation and Collaboration Experiences

Chair:  Stephanie Outridge-Field (Aus)

Stephanie Outridge Field has been working in the contemporary ceramics field for over 30 years.  Since graduating with both undergraduate and post graduate degrees from Sydney College of the Arts in 1980 she has been committed to her ceramics practice by exhibiting in both group and solo shows in Australia and New Zealand. Outridge Field has established a community ceramics workshop designing and fabricating public ceramics for corporate and government clients, been proactive in ceramics education and training in Qld and contributes writing to both national and international publications.

Stephanie Outridge Field has been working in the contemporary ceramics field for over 30 years. Since graduating with both undergraduate and post graduate degrees from Sydney College of the Arts in 1980 she has been committed to her ceramics practice by exhibiting in both group and solo shows in Australia and New Zealand. Outridge Field has established a community ceramics workshop designing and fabricating public ceramics for corporate and government clients, been proactive in ceramics education and training in Qld and contributes writing to both national and international publications.

Featured Artwork: Heated Words

 

Speakers:

 

Fiona Fell

Fiona Fell has a commitment to the material of clay and has for many years addressed issues integral to the genre of figuration in Ceramics. Her recent work and research engages collaborative practices of an inter-disciplinary nature concentrating on continuous materiality in dialogue with media based art forms such as film and photography. Professional artist for over 15yrs and educator at Tertiary institutions for over 10 years Fiona has received several international grants and exhibits widely both Nationally and Internationally. Fiona is represented by Watters Gallery in Sydney and is currently Head of Department in 3D studies, sculpture/ceramics at Southern Cross University.

Featured Artwork: One Night Stack

Transcript: Fiona Fell

 

Kris Coad

Kris Coad has been a practicing ceramicist for over 20 years, dividing her time between her studio practice and being an educator at RMIT Melbourne and Hong Kong.

Kris produces ceramic pieces for exhibition, a translucent porcelain tableware range for selected retail and pieces for commission.

 

In 2002 Kris was awarded a Masters of Fine Art by Research RMIT. During the same year she was the only Australian honoured at the Sydney Myer Fund International Ceramic Award Shepparton Art Gallery.

 

Kris has exhibited in over 70 exhibitions including Taiwan Ceramics Biennale, World Ceramic Biennale Korea, Dianne Tanzer Gallery Melbourne, Manly Museum and Art Gallery Sydney. Her work has featured in many magazines, journals and custom books including World Sculpture News, Ceramics Art and Perception International, Journal of Australian Ceramics, Ceramics Monthly USA.

 

Her work has been acquired for public collections including Icheon World Ceramic Centre Korea, Parliament House Canberra, Manly Museum & Art Gallery as well as private collections within Australia and overseas.

Featured Artwork: Journey Series (Detail)

Transcript: Kris Coad

 

Anton Reijnders (Netherlands)

Reijnders is acclaimed internationally for his ceramics exhibitions and commission work and his work is represented in many collections throughout Europe, Asia, Australia and the US. He uses simple forms such as spheres and cones to create poetic still life arrangements, frequently combining clay with other materials such as wood, cloth and newspaper. The arrangements of these objects are constructed to contest and undermine perceptions of the fragility of fired clay.

From 1987 - 2003, Reijnders headed the European Ceramic Work Centre (EKWC) in 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands. In this role, he collaborated with many international artists, designers and architects, challenging the possibilities of the ceramic process and facilitating the realisation of their experimental projects. He also assisted in developing new clay materials and technical processes which have been incorporated into important contemporary architectural projects.

Reijnders currently teaches at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy, Amsterdam and is the author of 'The Ceramic Process', an encyclopaedic work commissioned by the EKWC and an important text in the field of ceramics.

Featured Artwork: Reflect II

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Critwriticaling:  a discussion about wat's write and rong about critical writing in contemporary ceramics

Chair:  Vicki Grima (Aus)

My ceramic practice is squeezed between my positions as Editor of The Journal of Australian Ceramics (JAC) and Executive Officer of The Australian Ceramics Association (TACA). As editor and EO I am in daily contact with the ceramics community nationally and internationally, with my focus on representing the diversity of ceramics practice in Australia through our Journal and offering support to the sector via TACA’s membership services. In this rapidly changing digital world the challenge is to maintain relevance to the new ways of working, whilst also honouring the rich history of ceramics practice in Australia; www.australianceramics.com

I enjoy the rare times I spend in my studio in Botany surrounded by factories and close to the airport and the port yet nearby to many beautiful beaches. It is a small, quiet and peaceful space surrounded by a busy city. Nature is a constant inspiration – irregular repetition, delicate intricacies and inherent patterns which create and define the form; small time + small space = small work; www.vickigrima.com.au

Featured Artwork: 87 Spoons Detail

 

Speakers:

 

Dr Peter Wilson

Peter Wilson began making pots at high school and has been developing and refining his work ever since. His first exhibition was in 1977. He has exhibited and worked internationally and undertaken a research fellowship in Faenza, Italy, visiting professorships in Lahore, Pakistan and residencies in Rufford in the UK and in Canada at Burlington. He currently teaches at Charles Sturt University in Bathurst and works from his studio in the same city.

In his work, he values a strong sense of design and craftsmanship and appreciates the inherent ‘effects of the fire’ unique to ceramics.

Featured Artwork: Ancient Landscape


Transcript: Peter Wilson

 

Dr Damon Moon Ph.D

Numerous academic qualifications including a Masters of Arts in Fine Arts (Sculpture) Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and a Doctor of Philosophy (by dissertation) from the University of South Australia conferred in 2006.

 

Damon Moon has an extensive track record as a writer, curator and exhibiting artist spanning twenty-five years. He has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including the MF & MH Joyner Scholarship from the University of South Australia from 2001 through 2003.

As well as working in the field of ceramics he has been involved in the contemporary arts, curating an exhibition of contemporary Indonesian art seen at such venues as the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art and the Ivan Dougherty Gallery in Australia, the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art and Ludwig’s Forum in Aachen, Germany. This work was supported by the Australia Indonesia Institute and derived from an Asianlink residency undertaken in 1998.

As a writer and researcher, his articles have been published in refereed and general journals, including Journal of Australian Ceramics, Ceramics, Art and Perception, Ceramic Review and Craft Arts International. He recently contributed a chapter to Cone Ten Down – studio pottery in New Zealand 1945 – 1980 (lead authors Moyra Elliot and Dr. Damien Skinner) and he was a keynote speaker at the first Australian Ceramics Triennale held in Sydney in 2009.

Featured Artwork: AFter Malevich

 Transcript:  Damon Moon

Moyra Elliot (NZ)

Moyra is independent writer and curator with a specialty in ceramics. She writes for journals and contributes to books and catalogues. She is a curator of exhibitions for regional, national and international applications. She is active as an advisor for governmental institutions, exhibitions and competitions and speaks on aspects of ceramics in teaching institutions, art galleries and at conferences. She frequently serves as a juror for competitions. On the working party for some years, she was appointed to the inaugural Board of Objectspace in 2004 (national centre for object-making/design for NZ) to 2010 and now contributes as Special Advisor for Programming. She is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics and foundation member of Craftworkers – a regional think-tank for writers, theorists and curators involved with the media of crafts.

She brings to these capacities a background that includes many years of her own studio for ceramics exhibiting in New Zealand and internationally and the study of art history and theory, English and writing. She was Director of the Fletcher Challenge Ceramics Award 1990-96 – the years of international expansion, and Curator for the Dowse Art Museum when it functioned as national centre for the craft media in New Zealand. She has taught ceramics studio and history for tertiary institutions and received a Fulbright Foundation award for the study of tertiary education in ceramics in the USA.

She is co-author of a substantial book on the history of New Zealand studio ceramics between 1940-1980, Cone Ten Down, which was published in 2009 and was a nominated finalist in the 2010 NZ Post Book Awards. She is author of an earlier book on the history of a public art gallery in Auckland, New Zealand. Research for her second book on New Zealand studio ceramics 1980-2010 has commenced.

Featured Artwork: Cover of Cone Ten Down

 

Altair Roelants

 

Altair Roelants is a freelance arts writer and from London who relocated to Sydney in early 2010 – currently writing for a range of national arts publications about Australian contemporary visual art and ceramics.

 

Altair has a particular interest in ceramics in the context of the history and memory of objects, and how they resonate and translate in contemporary arts practices and circulate in the every day. She is also a lover and hoarder of ceramics – a fascination which stems from her childhood collections of blue and white china shards unearthed from her grandmother’s garden in East London.

 

Altair studied Art History and Contemporary Visual Culture at Goldsmiths College, University of London – gaining First Class Honors BA and The Visual Cultures Department Award for Excellence in Academic Achievement 2004-2006. She has worked in the visual arts for over a decade, collaborating on a broad range of artist, exhibition and text based creative projects. Alongside her writing, she presently coordinates arts projects for disadvantaged communities in Sydney’s South East.

Transcript: Altair Roelants

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Hyperclay:  Contemporary Ceramics

Chair:  Danielle Robson (Aus)

Danielle Robson is a curator and creative producer of contemporary art, craft and design. She currently holds the position of Creative Program Producer at Object: Australian Centre for Design, where she curated HYPERCLAY: Contemporary Ceramics and is currently developing Object’s next major creative program CUSP: Designing for the Next Decade. Danielle co-curated SafARI 2012 and SafARI 2010, the ‘unofficial’ fringe event to the Biennale of Sydney. She has written for various arts and design publications, and has extensive experience in curatorial, project management, exhibitions management, communications and programming. Danielle has undergraduate degrees in Law and Media Studies, and a Master of Art Administration from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales.

Featured Artwork:  Object, Surry Hills

 

Speakers:

 

Stephen Bird

installation view for i just dont believe in ceramics stephenbird

Born 1964 in Stoke on Trent, England. Lives and works Sydney (AUS) and Dundee (UK). He studied fine art at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in Dundee, and post graduate studies at Cyprus Art College. Since the early 1990’s he has worked in a variety of mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, animation and ceramics. Drawing reference from the 18th and 19th century Staffordshire tradition of the figurine, Bird subverts and imbues contemporary narratives exploring themes as broad as politics, religion and the everyday. His experiences working in countries such as Thailand, India, Scotland and Australia are evident in his work, which directly references a global view of archetypal themes of love, death, birth and life with an element of humor, social comment and political satire. His work is exhibited internationally including Collect, at The Saatchi Gallery, London, Contemporary Art Space Tasmania, SOFA Chicago and Rex Irwin Gallery, Sydney. He has undertaken a number of significant public art commissions and lectures at the National Art School, Sydney.

Featured Artwork: Installation view from i just don't believe in ceramics

Transscript: Stephen Bird

 

Rod Bamford

2

Roderick Bamford is a lecturer in the School of Design Studies, College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales.

His works traverses the fields of art and design, drawing on experience in the field of ceramics, digital technologies, and related media. For a number of years his artwork investigated the aesthetics of tension between development, redundancy and waste, in exhibitions such as Urban Debris at the National Gallery of Australia and Insensible Landscape at the Kohler Company in the USA.

Bamford has been awarded commissions and residencies, participated in exhibitions and presented numerous lectures internationally. His work is widely represented in major Australian public collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, and in museum collections in Europe, North Asia, and the USA such as the Today Museum in Beijing.

As President of the Crafts Council of NSW he led the establishment of the respected journal Object Magazine.

In 1999 his studio received an Australian Designex Award.

Bamford’s research explores relationships between virtual and material ecologies, exploring how our engagement with the designed objects and the meaning they embody is mediated by technology.

Featured Artwork:  Fuddling Manoeuvre

 

Jacqueline Clayton

Jacqueline Clayton’s work spans disciplines and definitions of practice. Over the last two decades she has engaged questions on the role of objects in representations of place and self, producing a range of installation based responses exhibited in Australia and overseas (e.g. Seven Australian Installation Artists; Artists in the House!; In[two]art; etc.).

 

Since 2006, Jacqueline has extended this investigation to incorporate adaptations of industrial manufacturing processes, equipment and materials to support sustainable, onshore design and production of ‘one-off’ and limited run ceramic objects that incorporate environmentally appropriate innovations in clay body formulation, firing and processes of production. This has seen her re-engagement with an earlier professional focus on ceramic technology and ceramic chemistry (e.g. United Nations Fund for Women and Australian Government [AIDAB] funding for the construction of earth buildings in tropical cyclone zones). Early outcomes were exhibited in Smartworks, curated by Grace Cochrane for the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney in 2007. More recent tableware designs resulting from this work include a series produced for Quay Restaurant, Sydney, using relatively low fired, fully vitrified porcelain.

 

Jacqueline trained in Japan at Saga College, Kyoto and the National Art School, Sydney after completing a Bachelor of Asian Studies at the Australian National University. In addition to her academic role at the College of Fine Arts, University of NSW, she maintains a personal creative practice and is principal of the design and production studio Press to Play. Jacqueline exhibits regularly in Australia and overseas and has contributed to a range of local and international publications.

 

Featured Artwork: Fragile Dreams

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Sustainable Practice - Oxymoronic or Axomatic

Chair:  Janet DeBoos (Aus)

After completing a science degree at the University of Sydney in the 60’s, studied under Peter Rushforth at East Sydney Tech 1970/71; taught at Canberra School of Art for four years, returning to Sydney to teach at various suburban TAFE colleges as well as East Sydney, before resigning to go sailing, finish writing the glaze section of Handbook for Australian Potters (her third publication) and start a production pottery (Brindabella Pottery) which she ran with her partner Michael Wignall for almost twenty years. Since then she has been seduced back into teaching, and is currently Head of Ceramics Australian National University School of Art. Over the last sixteen years she has become a regular visitor to China- engaging in projects with industry as well as undertaking residencies, and teaching (China Academy of Art). She has also inaugurated a biannual trip to China for students from the ANU Ceramics Workshop to the porcelain capital Jingdezhen.

Featured Artwork: Pheasant Bell

 

Speakers:

 

Cathy Keys

Cathy Keys is Queensland artist most commonly known by the ceramic sculptures she creates using the ancient technique of hand coiling.  She has degrees in architecture and went on to do a Doctorate of Philosophy concerned with the social and physical qualities of Warlpiri-speaking Aboriginal women’s traditional living environments found in Central Australia in the late 1990s.   After a short lived but gallant attempt at holding down a ‘real job’ full time, she studied ceramic hand-building part-time and has never looked back.  Her current ceramics practice is inspired by observing the interactions of people and environmental phenomenon in the Australian landscape.  More recently she has been exploring mark-making and larger installations of ceramics and mixed media. Cathy’s artwork is supported by place specific research and writing concerned with questions of culture and meaning.

Cathy Keys is Queensland artist most commonly known by the ceramic sculptures she creates using the ancient technique of hand coiling. She has degrees in architecture and went on to do a Doctorate of Philosophy concerned with the social and physical qualities of Warlpiri-speaking Aboriginal women’s traditional living environments found in Central Australia in the late 1990s.

After a short lived but gallant attempt at holding down a ‘real job’ full time, she studied ceramic hand-building part-time and has never looked back. Her current ceramics practice is inspired by observing the interactions of people and environmental phenomenon in the Australian landscape. More recently she has been exploring mark-making and larger installations of ceramics and mixed media. Cathy’s artwork is supported by place specific research and writing concerned with questions of culture and meaning.

Featured Artwork:  Catchment 2009

Transcript: Cathy Keys

 

Ben Richardson

savour tasmania - ben richardson instillation in progress  garagistes

Richardson was born in Tasmania and has a diverse professional and teaching background. He completed a Bachelor of Economics degree at the University of Tasmania in 1972, and a Master of Art, Design and Environment degree at the Tasmanian School of Art (UTAS) in 2004. He was a sessional lecturer in ceramics at the Tasmanian School of Art in Hobart from 1985 to 1995 and during this time directed and implemented the early prototype stage of the development of Southern Ice porcelain as co-researcher with Les Blakebrough.

Ben currently pursues a professional practice in ceramics from Ridgeline Pottery near Hobart along with teaching commitments as the part-time coordinator for Ceramics at the Tasmanian Polytechnic. His professional practice focuses on woodfiring and the use of indigenous raw materials in a place-based approach to craft making. However he also makes contemporary tableware - working with chefs like Luke Burgess and Rodney Dunn who seek to express an integrated plate-based response to place and season.

In 2011 he won the inaugural Vitrify Alcorso Ceramic Award with his exhibition " Placed " - a series of "instillations" of place-based work using local clays and glaze materials. Recently his "working pots" have found a place at the tables of Garagistes restaurant, The Agrarian Kitchen cooking school and in David Walsh's private apartment at the Museum of Old and New Art - MONA.

Featured Artwork: Savour Tasmania - Instillation in progress @ Garagistes, photo credit - Chris Crerar

 

Rod Bamford

2

Roderick Bamford is a lecturer in the School of Design Studies, College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales.

His works traverses the fields of art and design, drawing on experience in the field of ceramics, digital technologies, and related media. For a number of years his artwork investigated the aesthetics of tension between development, redundancy and waste, in exhibitions such as Urban Debris at the National Gallery of Australia and Insensible Landscape at the Kohler Company in the USA.

Bamford has been awarded commissions and residencies, participated in exhibitions and presented numerous lectures internationally. His work is widely represented in major Australian public collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, and in museum collections in Europe, North Asia, and the USA such as the Today Museum in Beijing.

As President of the Crafts Council of NSW he led the establishment of the respected journal Object Magazine.

In 1999 his studio received an Australian Designex Award.

Bamford’s research explores relationships between virtual and material ecologies, exploring how our engagement with the designed objects and the meaning they embody is mediated by technology.

Featured Artwork:  Fuddling Manoeuvre

 

Liz Stops

Investigations into Colonisation

Liz was born in Western Australia but has lived in Northern New South Wales for many years. She was introduced to ceramics when she began a contemporary visual arts degree at Southern Cross University in 1991.

She endeavours to align her resource-conservative lifestyle with her object-making art practice. In 2007 she embarked on a PhD project, entitled Carbon Credits, in which she developed works that were informed by an understanding of her local landscape and contextualised within a worldview of an environment at risk. In 2011 she was awarded a PhD.

Liz teaches casually in the 3D Studio at Southern Cross University and in the Ceramics Department at Lismore TAFE. She also plays a major administrative role in Union Street Design Studio, a shared, artist-run studio that has been operating in Lismore since 1995.

Featured Artwork: Investigations into Colonisation

Transcript: Liz Stops

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Lighting Fires and Building Futures

Chair:  Bruce Nuske (Aus)

Bruce Nuske has combined a ceramics practice and visual arts teaching career spanning 40 years. He has taught a wide range of subjects at tertiary level with a specialised focus in ceramics and drawing. An abiding passion for teaching the importance of drawing as an integral component of the creative process and of the application of these ideas to design and production, continues to inspire and inform many students at Adelaide College of the Arts and the Jam Factory in South Australia.

Graduating from the S.A. School of Art in 1972, Bruce has maintained an active and well recognised Ceramics practice with participation in many ceramics exhibitions and surveys both locally and internationally..His work is represented in all State Gallery collections within Australia, the Australian National Gallery and in many private collections in Australia and overseas. Work was exhibited for ‘COLLECT” at the V&A Museum, UK in 2006, 2007 and 2008 and purchased for the Duke of Devonshire, Chatsworth, UK. In 2012, during the Australian Ceramics Triennale in Adelaide he will be showing in ‘Irrational and Idiosyncratic’ at The Samstag Museum, (Uni SA,) BMG Art, Art Gallery of SA, SASA Gallery (Uni SA), and ‘Directors Choice’ at the Jam Factory, SA.

Featured Artwork: Blue Set

 

Speakers:

 

Liz Williams

Subversive Soldner.

 

There are experiences in life that stay with one and continue to grow in significance and for me being taught by Paul Soldner has been such an experience.

 

He was an inventor, artist, philosopher and all of these aspects of his life flowed seamlessly together into the inspirational and great humanitarian teacher that he was.

 

He died in February 2011 after an extraordinarily creative and influential 89 years.

 

I have chosen Soldner’s ‘ Subversive Teaching Style’ as the content of my paper.

Featured Artwork: Ladder

Transcript: Liz Williams 

 

Jan Guy

Jan Guy is an artist, writer and lecturer in the ceramics studio at Sydney College of the Arts, the visual arts faculty of the University of Sydney, Australia. She maintains a broad practice and interest in ceramics with a specific focus on sculptural and installedworks. While her personal research is presently concerned with relationships between the haptic senses and virtual spaces, she has an ongoing interest in feminist art practices and craft and design theory.

Guy has been an advocate for the growth and continuation of Australian ceramic arts through writing for national journals and major exhibitions in the field, including 'Celebration', the catalogue essay for the 2000 Australian Ceramics Association exhibition and the 2006 SOFA catalogue, as well as numerous catalogue essays for emerging artists.

Guy has been the recipient of a National Craft Acquisition Award and her work is in the collection of the Museum and Art Gallery of the NorthernTerritory and the National Taiwan University of the Arts. In 2009 Guy was a member of the organising committee for the 1st Australian Ceramics Triennale. She also established CELSIUS, an online peer-reviewed journal for the disciplines of ceramics, glass and jewellery and object design.

Featured work:  From Erewhon (2009)

Transcript:  Jan Guy

 

Prue Venables

venables 01 tamis 1

I have been a practitioner in ceramics since 1977 when I first began pottery classes in London. From 1981 to 1983, I studied at the prestigious Harrow College of Art Studio Pottery Course, surviving by working as an editor of Scientific research directories for Longmans publishers. After graduating, I shared a studio with renowned British ceramic artist Alison Britton until my return to Australia in 1989. During this time, I also taught pottery for the Inner London Education Authority and Harrow College of Art.

Since returning to Australia, I have combined teaching and working from my studio in Melbourne, with my technical focus shifting from earlier high fired and decorated thrown earthenware shapes to more minimal thrown and constructed forms in porcelain. These pieces are technically extremely challenging and have won awards both in Australia and overseas. The focus of my work has been the small scale production of high quality hand made functional pottery. I have exhibited this work consistently in Australia, Europe, Asia and America.

All of my work is handmade, but I have always had an interest in industrial methods, materials and thinking. In 2003, I was awarded an Australia Council Development Award to investigate methods of firing unusual porcelain forms at high temperatures. I travelled to the UK, France and Scandinavia to visit porcelain factories. This investigation has been extremely influential on my work and I have been able to successfully experiment and extend the areas of my current research. A further grant in 2009 enabled much more experimental, risky and exciting developments.

In 2004, I was awarded a one month residency at Oribe Design Centre, Gifu, Japan – to design a dinner set for production in re-cycled porcelain by Yamai China Co. and Yamama China Co. This was very challenging and strengthened my interest in the parallel connections that exist between the genre of the hand made and the industrially made object.

More recently I was appointed Creative Director of the Ceramics Studio at Jam Factory Contemporary Craft and Design in Adelaide.

Featured Artwork: Tamis 1

 

Jane Sawyer

Jane Sawyer holds a B. Ed(Art) and an MFA by research (Ceramics) from RMIT University, Victoria. Professional experience includes traineeships with Andrew Halford, Sydney (1982 – 85) and Shussai-Gama, Shimane, Japan, (1985 – 87). Her studio practice is based in Melbourne, Australia. Sawyer was a guest artist at Tableware: Form & Design at the research centre of The Museum of International Ceramic Art, Denmark (2002) and at Clay Feast, Gulgong, NSW (2001). Solo exhibitions include Freeland Gallery (2008), JamFactory Design Centre (2007), Christine Abrahams Gallery (2003), Craft Victoria Gallery (2001), Ichibata Gallery (1996) and Kusa Gallery, Osaka, Japan (1996) and her work toured UK galleries in 2001-02 in Contemporary Slipware and is currently touring in Tooth and Nail, an exhibition exploring Asian-Australian influences in contemporary ceramics curated by RMIT Gallery.

Sawyer was an Australian exhibitor at Collect, at the V&A Museum, London in 2009. Permanent collections include the Museum of International Ceramics, Denmark; Hikawa City Collection, Japan; Bendigo Regional Art Gallery; Shepparton Art Gallery; and Artbank, Australia.Sawyer is an experienced teacher at all levels of education from primary, secondary, tertiary and community education. In 2012 she expanded her private classes into what is now known as Slow Clay Centre. She employs other artist-teachers, guest artist workshops and forums and has mission statement to spread the love of all things ceramic.

Artwork: Message Series - Bowl

Transcript:  Jane Sawyer

 

Gus Clutterbuck

Clutterbuck holds a Bachelor of Arts, Flinders University (1985); Advanced Diploma of Visual Art, North Adelaide School of Art (2000); Graduate Diploma of Community Cultural Development, Community Arts Network of SA (2001) and Bachelor of Visual Art, Adelaide Centre for the Arts, TAFE SA (2004). In 2007 he undertook a Helpmann Academy artist-in-residence at Sanskriti Kendra, New Delhi, which included exhibiting in International Elephant in the same year. Clutterbuck exhibited in Art of Bioethics, Salon Mali, Rijeka Museum of Modern Art, Croatia (2008), as part of the 9th World Congress of Bioethics and was awarded Special Prize for his work Plastic Geology (2011) in the Gyeonggi International Ceramix Biennale, Icheon, South Korea (2011). Stayin Alive, a solo exhibition of the artist’s work concerned with ethical issues relating to doctor-patient relationships and pharmaceutical marketing, was presented by JamFactory Contemporary Craft & Design (2006) and Flinders Medical Centre (2007). In 2011 Clutterbuck’s “Muffler Vases”, was acquired by the Art Gallery of South Australia.

Featured Artwork: Broken Landscape

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Shamless Self Promotion

Chair:  Brian Parks (Aus)

Brian Parkes has been Director of the JamFactory in Adelaide since April 2010 and is both CEO and Artistic Director. He spent ten years prior to this as Associate Director and Senior Curator at Object: Australian Centre for Craft and Design. He curated several important exhibitions for Object including the landmark survey of contemporary Australian design; Freestyle: new Australian design for living. Parkes has written extensively on design and contemporary crafts and in 2009 co-curated Menagerie a major exhibition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sculpture currently touring Australia.

In 2007 Parkes was one of ten curators invited by Phaidon Press, London to contribute to &Fork, a hefty book profiling 100 emerging product designers from around the world and in 2008 he was an Adjunct Curator for the Museum of Arts and Design in New York.

A graduate of the Tasmanian School of Art in Hobart, Parkes has a significant and unusual background in both the creative and commercial spheres within museums and galleries. In the 1990s he managed the merchandising and retail operations at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (1998-2000) and the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra (1995-98). At both institutions Parkes was regularly involved in major exhibition project teams, development of publications and strategic planning. Prior to this Parkes managed the exhibition program and retail activity at Entrepot Art Products, on campus at the Tasmanian School of Art, Hobart (1991-95).

Featured Artwork: JamFactory Comtemporary Craft & Design

 

Speakers:

 

Robyn Phelan

Robyn Phelan

Critiques on ceramic, craft and art history, a sense of place and formal sculptural issues inform my work.

When making, each form begets the next, until groupings are formed. The process of choice and composition of the final display is highly considered and crucial to the personal narratives I wish to convey.

Each object makes obvious the marks of the skilled hand on clay with craft knowledge as the foundation of my material practice. I use the traditional technique of ceramics. Pinching and coiling of stoneware and porcelain is finished with a variety of artist made stains and glazes. My fundamental and familiar forms perform as honest, cultural signifiers.

Featured Artwork: Pilgrimage - Seven Summits

Transcript: Robyn Phelan

 

Anna Maas

Anna Maas is the Managing Director of Skepsi on Swanston Gallery, which has operated from Swanston Street in Melbourne for 14 years. The gallery specializes in the exhibition and sale of Australian studio art, with a strong emphasis on ceramics, and included painting, glasswork, jewellery and sculpture.

Anna is dedicated to the promotion, familiarisation and appreciation of ceramics, the support of early career ceramic artists and informing the collector. She has built a loyal and enthusiastic following for ceramics through successful exhibitions that are informative, inspirational and curious.

She continually and enthusiastically lobbies to regional galleries and institutions for the purchase of ceramics into their permanent collections and networks with corporate organisations to include ceramics in their interior spaces.

She is presently involved in the establishment of a private Australian Ceramic Museum and Gallery in Melbourne.

Anna is an approved valuer for the Australian Cultural Gifts Program and is contracted by regional galleries and institutions as an advisor on ceramics. She assists in the training of staff in handling ceramics, the set-up of exhibitions, cataloguing and sorting of ceramics. She also participates on judging panels.

Her background is that of a practicing artist in ceramics, painting and drawing, has over 25 years experience in the arts community and has completed a course in Setting up Small Business.

Anna and her team, currently curate ceramic exhibitions at different locations throughout Melbourne.

Featured Image: Interior of Skepsi @ Manningham Gallery, Doncaster, Melbourne

 

Fleur Schell

Fleur Schell

Fleur Schell’s home and studio are in North Fremantle, Western Australia.

“Using porcelain I love to make sentimental objects that are rich in detail, playful and familiar. I am drawn to objects that provide us with individual recognisability, especially those essential objects that are instrumental to our daily rituals. I relish the discipline required and the challenges presented in making an object using porcelain. With the early morning sun filtering through the studio windows, accompanied by my favorite playlist humming away, it is here I enjoy the quiet place in my head that working with clay sweeps me away to."

In 2005 with her husband Richard Hill, Fleur Schell founded SODA – Sculpture Objects and Design Australia, an International Ceramic Residency and Studio’s in North Fremantle.

“Through the sharing of clay knowledge I have been introduced to people and places that have profoundly enriched the lives of our family and I. I am grateful to work with a material that has allowed me to embrace the Mantra – it’s a new environment that makes life interesting but it’s the people we meet along the way that gives life meaning”.

Featured Artwork: Poe and the Grub

Transcript: Fleur Schell

Leslie Ferrin (USA)

INNOVATIONS IN GALLERY PRACTICE POST - RECESSION

How has the economy permanently changed the bricks-and-mortar model for galleries and the artists that depend on them?

 

Since the recession started in 2008, dramatic changes have taken place in the marketplace causing significant upheaval for artists and the galleries that show and presumably sell, their art.  Leslie Ferrin, director of Ferrin Gallery presents an overview of innovative gallery programs and curated exhibitions that actively engage artists, curators and new collectors.  Included in the presentation will be images of recent works by artists the gallery represents, Chris Antemann, Christa Assad, Molly Hatch, Giselle Hicks, Sergei Isupov, Mara Superior, Jason Walker and others featured in the 2010 – 2012 curated group exhibitions:  Re-Objectification, COVET and Pursuit of Porcelain.  Also shown are site visits during the developmental process of the exhibitions including artist studios and museum collections such as Museum of Fine Arts Boston, MA; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Clark, Williamstown, MA.  She will conclude with the final installations of these shows presented in the gallery and at art fairs in Chicago, New York and Miami. 


Leslie Ferrin is founder, owner and director of Ferrin Gallery. Established in 1979, Ferrin Gallery is internationally known as a contemporary gallery specializing in ceramic sculpture and studio pottery. The gallery works closely with private collectors, institutions and the media as a source for works by both established and emerging artists through curated exhibitions, partnerships with other galleries and participation at international art fairs.   Located in the culturally rich Berkshires of Western Massachusetts, the gallery is equidistant from New York City and Boston.  In addition to the gallery, Ferrin is founder, director and co-owner of Project Art in Cummington, MA.  Established in 2007 and co-owned with sculptor, Sergei Isupov, Project Art offers year round and short term artist residencies and studio rentals in a restored 8000 square foot, 19th century former mill building.

Featured Artwork: Ferrin Gallery

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Working Together:  Indigenous Australian Ceramics as Collaborative Partnership

Chair:  Dr Christine Nicholls (Aus)

Dr Christine Nicholls is a writer, curator and academic working inAustralian Studies at Adelaide's Flinders University. She has publishedtwelve books and is well published in the field of Indigenous Australianartistic practice, about which she has been writing and speaking inAustralia and overseas for several decades now. She has published over 200articles in this and related fields of visual arts and crafts, includingIndigenousand other Australian ceramics. In the 1980s Christine Nichollsspent many years living at Lajamanu, a remote Aboriginal settlement in theNorthern Territory, working first as a linguist and then as the Principal ofthe local bilingual Warlpiri Lajamanu School.

Christine Nicholls is currently the General Editor of the highly regardedpeer reviewed international journal Australian Art Education as well as theAustralian Editor of two high circulation visual arts magazines - Asian ArtNews and World Sculpture News, based in Hong Kong. She has curated numerousart exhibitions in Australia, Europe and Asia. Christine is currentlyworking on several books about Indigenous Australian art for Thames andHudson.

Featured Artwork: Cover of Art History Place

 

Speakers:

 

Alison Milyika Carroll

Alison Milyika Carroll is the Director of Ananguku Arts and on the board of Ernabella Arts. In this capacity she represents the APY Art Centres on a national and international stage, and is often called upon to speak publicly, at national public institutions and with state and federal parliamentarians.

 

Born in 1958 in the community which was known as Ernabella Mission, Milyika continues to live and work in the same place which is now known as Pukatja Community. She has five children, three grandchildren and is a trained health worker. Milyika enjoys travelling to other countries in her capacity as a working artist and public speaker. Her artwork reflects her identity as a contemporary and senior Pitjantjatara/Yankunytjatjara woman. She was Anangu Mayatja (Manager) at Ernabella Arts 2004 – 2007 and Chairperson of Ernabella Arts from 2007 - 2010. From 2004 - 2006 Milyika was Chairperson of Ananguku Arts and Culture Aboriginal Corporation (Ku Arts) and is currently the Director of that organisation, overseeing its expansion from the APY Lands to a state based organisation.

 

Milyika's husband Pepai Carroll is a former community policeman who joined the art centre on retiring. He is the current Chair of Ernabella Arts. Both the Carrolls are on the governing council of Ernabella Anangu School. They are strong leaders and excellent spokespeople for APY artists. Milyika is regularly called on to speak at the opening of exhibitions at public institutions.

Featured Artwork: Her Story

Transcript: Alison Milyika Carroll 

Darryl Pfitzner Milika

Darryl Pfitzner Milika, who is of Kokatha Indigenous heritage has worked as a professional artist for almost three decades now. Well known as a mixed media artist, philosopher and raconteur, Milika has developed a diverse artistic practice that includes painting and sculpture as well as smaller works in which he utilises precious stones, found objects, and other flotsam and jetsam, often making strongly social/political statements wrought with a trademark sense of wry or subversive humour.  Pfitzner Milika's work is included in many collections and has been displayed in numerous solo and group exhibitions, the most recent opening at Adelaide's Tandanya National Aboriginal Culture Institute on September 28th 2012.

In the current context, during 1993 and 1994 Darryl Pfitzner Milika acted as the Designer, Project Director and Principal Artist for a collaborative group project that involved the creation of a ground and wall-based large scale metal and ceramic work, a sculptural installation entitled Yerrakartarta that stands in the forecourt of Adelaide's Intercontinental Hotel. This project, a joint commission between himself and Stephen Bowers (then Ceramics Principal at The Jam Factory) included South Australian ceramic artists Jo Crawford and Jo Fraser as well as well-known Kaurna/Ngarrendjeri artist Muriel van der Byl. While Darryl Pfitzner Milika is in fact the copyright holder for this work, he maintains that he does so in trust on behalf of all those who worked on it as well as the Aboriginal community at large: at the time (opened in February 1995) it was the largest Australian commission for any public artwork directly under the control of an Indigenous artist, also including a formal consultative process with local (Kaurna) representatives as part of its’ initial development.

Featured Artwork: Yerrakartarta 1993 - 1994

 

Tom Miller

tom miller ernabella

My history is as a primary teacher in government schools. As part of my teaching in Primary, Special and Aboriginal Schools I have involved students in ceramics wherever possible.

I studied ceramics at university (Wattle Park Teachers College) as part of my Art course.

In the years 2000 - 2007 I coordinated a ceramics programme at Ernabella Anangu School on the Pitjantjatjara Lands.

We built a purpose built shed with equipment and kiln. In cooperation with the Ernabella Arts Centre we employed a ceramicist who worked at both facilities.

Over the years we used Artists in residence and my presentation includes footage of Lincoln Kirby-bell working with students at Ernabella.

The aims of the program were

            - enjoyment

            - developing ceramic skills

            - encouraging future employment at Arts Centre

            - secondary SACE

The ceramics program is still operational and some ex students have done ceramics at the Arts Centre.

Featured Artwork: Ernabella

 

Janet Fieldhouse

Janet Fieldhouse uses ceramic mediums to explore her Torres Strait Island heritage and culture and its relationship to a broader Australia.

Born and raised in Cairns, Queensland, Janet currently lives and works in Canberra from where she graduated with a Master of Philosophy (Visual Arts) from the School of Art at the Australian National University in 2008.

Janet was awarded the inaugural Indigenous Ceramic Art Award FROM Shepparton Art Gallery in 2007, and was also announced the winner of the Award in 2012. She held her first solo exhibition at Vivien Anderson Gallery, Melbourne in 2009, and her artworks are held in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; and the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth amongst others.

Featured Artwork: Armbands 2008.  Fexible porcelain.  Courtesy the artist and Vivian Anderson Gallery, Melbourne.  Photography:  Rob Little

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Interrogating Ceramic Histories:  Graduate Student Research Panel

Chair:  Dr Patsy Hely (Aus)

Dr Patsy Hely is an academic and a practicing artist. She completed her PhD 'Ceramic Objects and the Articulation of Place' at the Australian National University in 2007. Studio and allied research interests include colonial ceramics and ceramics, place and identity. She is currently Graduate Coursework/Honours Convenor at the ANU School of Art.

Featured Artwork: Island 2011

 

Skeakers:

 

Clarissa Regan (SCA)

Clarissa Regan is an artist/writer from Sydney. She is currently a PhD candidate at the Sydney College of the Arts, Sydney University. She has been awarded a post-graduate scholarship to undertake research into her project examining the effects of digital screen culture upon contemporary society. Clarissa is a practicing artist who works incorporates print transfer techniques in her ceramics, as well as figurative forms. She both writes and works in the ceramic art field, and was invited to deliver a conference paper at the NZ Society of Potters Annual Conference in Auckland, April 2011. She teaches ceramic workshops and in the TAFE sector. She has exhibited widely in NSW, in both regional galleries such as Hazelhurst, Casula Powerhouse and the Shoalhaven Gallery, as well as in artist-run co-operatives such as the Inner City Clayworkers Gallery. Her work was recently featured in 500 Vases (Lark Books, 2010). She holds a Master of Visual Arts from SCA (2009) and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) from the National Art School (2006).

Featured Artwork: Regan Hansel in Cage

 

Sally Cleary (RMIT)

Sally Cleary is a Melbourne artist, and has been researching the Still Life Genre since 2001. She started her PhD at RMIT University in 2007 investigating the re-interpretation of still life in the 21st century. Her oeuvre in ceramics includes architectural ceramics 1986-2000, with several large scale public art commissions and exhibitions of one-off wall pieces. He current work consists of mixed media sculptures, installations and photographic works. Sally is also a lecturer at RMIT University in Object based Practice.

Featured Artwork: Silent River (2011)

 

Cathy Franzi (UNA)

Cathy Franzi has a background in science including botany, which along with her experience in outdoor education informs her ceramic work. She began production throwing at Aiston Park Pottery, Adelaide in the 1980s, also working for Stephen Bowers throwing his Andamooka range and Margaret McCaul. Extensive travel with a focus on ceramics followed, highlights including staying with potters in northeast Thailand, visiting historic sites in Iznik, Turkey, working with potters in Ireland and England and visiting gallery and museum collections.

A residency in Duffcarrig Camphill Community in Ireland for eighteen months involved Franzi in teaching adults with an intellectual disability while running the pottery workshop. She has been established in Canberra for 15 years teaching at the Canberra Potters’ Society and more recently at ANU. She completed her MVA in 2010 and currently is a fulltime PhD candidate in the Ceramic workshop at ANU.

Featured Artwork: Mount Majura Seed Box (Detail)

Transcript: Cathy Franzi

 

Trevor Fry (COFA)

Trevor Fry is a Sydney based artist currently engaged in PhD research in ceramics at Sydney College of the Arts. His topic is the relevance and potential of concepts of primality and vital force in contemporary ceramics. Trevor has exhibited in artist run situations in Sydney for many years and between 2003 and 2007 he was a member of the Wild Boys art collective who created gay happenings and performed radical drag in public space. Originally a figurative painter, he undertook studies in History, Art History and Fine Arts in New Zealand, studied video and animation at the College of Fine Arts, UNSW (Cofa) in 2001, and in 2011 completed his MVA in ceramics at SCA. In his performance videos, drawings and abject installations he has played with transgression using confronting sexual imagery and excess. More recently he has applied this aesthetic to ceramics with the production of large-scale and intensely decorated coil-built sculptures which he has exhibited as part of unruly and chaotic installations incorporating video, clay detritus and other material.

Featured Artwork:  Untitled, 2009

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Learning Against the Tide – Student Panel

Chair:  Alison Smiles (Aus)

As an emerging artist the main area of my practice involves sculptural ceramic work that explores the gaps between the art object and the intangible world of human relationships. Having recently completed my final year of Bachelor of Visual Arts at University of South Australia and also the University of Sunderland, UK, as part of a student exchange, this opportunity has afforded me the ability to explore my work in a practice based process, enriching my work and helping me to question and develop my practice further.

Featured Artwork: Gilda

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